90 seconds to midnight: World closer to doomsday than ever – Doomsday Clock

90 seconds to midnight: World closer to doomsday than ever – Doomsday Clock

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Earth is closer to a catastrophic global demise than ever before, with the famous Doomsday Clock of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists being at 90 seconds to midnight, thanks in large part to the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

This is the closest the clock has ever been to reaching the dreaded midnight.

Earth is closer to a catastrophic global demise than ever before, with the famous Doomsday Clock of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists being at 90 seconds to midnight, thanks in large part to the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

This is the closest the clock has ever been to reaching the dreaded midnight.

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This marks a 10-second change compared to 2022 when the Doomsday Clock was set at 100 seconds to midnight.

“We are living in a time of unprecedented danger, and the Doomsday Clock time reflects that reality,” Bulletin president and CEO Rachel Bronson said, adding that “90 seconds to midnight is the closest the Clock has ever been set to midnight, and it’s a decision our experts do not take lightly. The US government, its NATO allies and Ukraine have a multitude of channels for dialogue; we urge leaders to explore all of them to their fullest ability to turn back the Clock.”

Why is it just 90 seconds to midnight?

The change was largely due to the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the subsequently increased possibility of nuclear war, especially with the nuclear rhetoric espoused by officials in Moscow.

However, there were other factors at play too, such as the ongoing climate crisis.

What is the Doomsday Clock?

The Doomsday Clock was first created in 1947 as a metaphorical countdown to the end of the world as we know it. Specifically, it refers to the impending global disaster that is solely caused by human hands, and it is adjusted every January upon review by scientists from the Bulletin.

Upon its unveiling in 1947, the clock was

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